“When All is Said and Done, More is Usually Said Than Done” – Lou Holtz

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I am not a big Lou Holtz fan, however during his years as the head football coach at Notre Dame University he did share some glorious nuggets of wisdom. “When all is said and done, more is usually said than done” has always been an all to often forgotten favorite of mine. For me this quote has always been a reminder to do more walking the walk than talking the talk even though these days I seem to be too busy to do seldom more than talk the walk or has Coach Holtz may have put it saying the done.

 

As I blur through my days in and out of the many hotels and operations that we have here at H.I. Development I must constantly remind myself that I am always under the scrutiny of employees. They watch my every action to gauge both my belief in what I say as well my practice of the same.

 

The people most influenced by my actions aren’t always aware of how many projects I have going, how late I am for the next meeting, or the incredible amount of paperwork piling up on my desk. They only know what I ask them to do. Of course I am always quick to remind them that I never ask them to do anything I wouldn’t do or haven’t done myself. If you make statements like that you better make sure you are modeling the behaviors that you are expecting from everyone else.

 

Personally, my success has all come from walking the walk and backing up the talk. With increased responsibility and the need to delegate the many tasks necessary to keep the organization running smoothly has made me feel like I spend a lot of time talking about the walk.

 

As Managers and Supervisors we all have to remember that no matter how busy we are we must make a very conscious effort to make sure that when all is said and done that as much if not more was done as said.

 

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by: Larry E. Collier, Jr., Director of Operations

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